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HAIKU: Our Three Top Wishes?

30/11/2016

“Destiny grants us our wishes, but in its own way, in order to give us something beyond our wishes.” Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

HAIKU: Our Three Top Wishes? - What we wish for others, we wish for ourselves

HAIKU: Our Three Top Wishes? – What we wish for others, we wish for ourselves

What do I wish for?
To walk freely on this earth?
Live meaningfully

What would you wish for?
To heal the sick and downcast?
Share generously

What should we wish for?
To build bridges to World Peace?
Serve and love deeply

What do I wish for?
What would you wish for our world?
What should we wish for?

Live meaningfully
Love deeply
Share generously

What 3 altruistic things come to mind when you wish for good? For this week’s Discover Challenge on lists in sets of threes, – One, Two, Three!– we are invited to work with lists/ideas that focus our attention on a trio; triumvirate, triad, trinity, troika or threesome. Why Our Three Top Wishes? I added the question mark so each of us can come to the questions from our own hearts. We get to choose how we wish to express this idea and my choice is to look at the altruistic wishes we hold dear to our hearts. Yes, we can wish for whatever we want but, once we do so, we must move our feet and act on them to clarify our goals… That is expected.

 

 

“My best friend is the man who in wishing me well wishes it for my sake.” Aristotle

HAIKU: Our Three Top Wishes? - What we wish for others, we wish for ourselves

HAIKU: Our Three Top Wishes? – What we wish for others, we wish for ourselves

In a perfect world…
An altruistic heart will
wish the blind to see

Help mankind battle…
insidious bad habits
that hurt treasured goals

Turn hearts to wish for …
the end of global conflict
Hate … swept out to sea

What do I wish for?
What would you wish for our world?
What should we wish for?

Live meaningfully
Love deeply
Share generously

What is a Haiku? It is typically a three-line poem, written in a 5/7/5 (17) syllable count style that conveys a succinct message about a topic of choice. It originated in the 13th Century in Japan and while traditionally, the focus has often been on images from nature, today, it is written with various themes in mind. What many enjoy about this poetic form is its emphasis on “simplicity, intensity, and directness of expression.“(poets.org)

 

More Below!

“Where there is great love, there are always wishes.” Willa Cather

HAIKU: Our Three Top Wishes? - What we wish for others, we wish for ourselves

HAIKU: Our Three Top Wishes? – What we wish for others, we wish for ourselves

In our youthful years
we seek adventure to flourish
And live for ourselves

In our middle age
we nurture our family
and build a nest egg

In our older days
we gather around loved ones
And we reminisce

What do I wish for?
What would you wish for our world?
What should we wish for?

Live meaningfully
Love deeply
Share generously

Why in Haiku? It is a great way to edit the verbiage and get to the meat of our pov. Even though I have followed the classic Haiku format of 5-7-5 syllables, I have also included as my last stanza, of each set, a 5-3-5 syllable haiku as a way to tie the piece together. Traditionally, haiku, which is also HAIKU in plural, focuses on events in nature and the wisdom of life around us. However, modern day Haiku writers venture beyond that realm and explore topics that hold their interest; including whimsical, humorous lines… It is all acceptable and has merit. The creative impulse touches us differently and we are best served by following the drum beats of our heart… Write what you know and what inspires you!

This post was inspired by a Daily Word Prompt:  – One, Two, Three!Taking inspiration from an obsession with lists, we challenge you to create in sets of threes. Today, in the spirit of list making, the challenge is to create in sets of three in the medium of your choice. Poets might try a few tercets, or perhaps its most accessible form — the haiku. Photographers and artists might consider working in triptychs to capture a subject in evolution or experimenting with the rule of thirds. Playwrights, how about a comedy or drama in three acts? Foodies, why not envision and prepare a three-course meal? Composers, how about a new piece in three-quarter time?  Write a new post in response to today’s one-word prompt. Not sure how to participate? Here are the steps to get started.

 

Positive Motivation Tip: Wish good for Self and for Others … we are connected in more ways than we know…

PHOTO CREDITS/ATTRIBUTIONS: All Photos: From PublicDomain photos on Pixabay and my Personal Collection

Until Next Time…
Ask. Believe. Receive. ©
Elizabeth Obih-Frank
Mirth and Motivation
Positive Kismet

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13 Comments leave one →
  1. Tyler permalink
    30/11/2016 4:31 pm

    Wow this piece was beautifully written! I absolutely loved it. Share generously is something I believe in so much I could tattoo it ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    • 30/11/2016 9:53 pm

      And I wish we saw more of it in the world. WE are beneficiaries of an abundant planet yet, many go to bed without food or a place to sleep and feel safe. ❤

      Like

  2. Sandra Crespo permalink
    30/11/2016 5:15 pm

    Love this ! Lately the #3 has been everywhere I look and then I read this about Haiku 😄 Great poems ty

    Like

  3. Amber permalink
    30/11/2016 6:13 pm

    This is so nice! Top wishes for me is obviously health and happiness for my family. And maybe for calories not to count.

    Like

    • 30/11/2016 9:50 pm

      Hahaha! I really thought about the calorie conflict issue, and our obsession with dieting and diet foods. I thought of a few other every day struggles but decided to go another route… They do matter though. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  4. theforeverteacher permalink
    30/11/2016 7:13 pm

    I LOVE this so much!! Writing really motivates me…. I am a former English poetry teacher, so I had to teach my students about the haiku.

    Like

    • 30/11/2016 9:48 pm

      Ahh! A kindred spirit. I taught ELA for many years and this was one area that students either loved or resented… I get the sentiment. 🙂

      Like

  5. Jane Porterfield permalink
    30/11/2016 8:48 pm

    I love it (them). I love how you’ve expressed your sentiments. I also applaud you for educating folks on one form of poetry.

    Like

    • 30/11/2016 9:46 pm

      Thank you Jane for taking the time to read my haiku and respond to it. I’ve been a student of poetry and haiku for a while, and I find it quite challenging yet mentally rewarding. I have a long road to go with it but I love the medium. 🙂

      Like

  6. Marceline Dementori permalink
    01/12/2016 6:04 am

    Live meaningfully
    Love deeply
    Share generously

    There are no better wishes for the world and life than those. It’s also a good reminder to check on how we’re doing as human beings these days. There’s just too much hatred and we have to remind ourselves what it is like to be human and to care for each other.

    Like

    • 01/12/2016 11:01 am

      Precisely…. we live on an amazing planet that sustains us and yet, some can’t see beyond their hatreds…. May we all find that peace inside. TY! ❤

      Like

  7. Author Brandi Kennedy permalink
    17/04/2017 7:24 pm

    Beautiful poetry! I’ve always loved the way Haiku can feel so musical, but they stay so quick and to the point. I’ve always wished I could write them – but I tend to be much too wordy to fit the format.

    Fortunately, I fit novels just fine, lol.

    Like

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