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On Father’s Day: The Gift of Wisdom

20/06/2010

Happy Father’s Day: Reflections on the Wisdom of the Heart and Mind…
“Whatever is at the center of our life will be the source of our security, guidance, wisdom, and power.” ~ Stephen Covey
“If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God, who gives to all liberally and without reproach, and it will be given to him.”~James 1:5

Happy Father's Day: The Eye of Wisdom...

Wisdom: The ability to discern or judge what is true, right, or lasting; insight. Common sense; good judgment. American Heritage Dictionary

Happy Father’s Day! Recently, I was reading a Daily Devotional on the Streaming Faith site when the minister said something that sizzled with such clarity that I would easily call it a lightening bolt moment for me. He said that people come to God with a litany of requests for all sorts of material goods. He said what we should really ask for is the Gift of Wisdom; divine wisdom. This is what many of us call common sense.

Ironically, common sense isn’t so common. Daily, we have the opportunity to make decisions that uplift and empower us and those around us. Yet, again and again, many of us revert to our patterns, our habits, our little scheming ways that neither uplift nor enlighten us or those around us. We act from our inherited DNA coding and acquired habits and wisdom takes a backseat to our patterns and passions. To ask for wisdom is truly the beginning of understanding life and its intricacies. We could all use some wisdom especially as we parent our children/grandchildren. On this Father’s Day, I’d like to invite our father figures to ask for wisdom in their parenting, workplace and interactions with others.

“He who arbitrates a case by force does not thereby become just. But the wise man is he who carefully discriminates between right and wrong.” ~ Buddha
“To tell the truth is revolutionary.” ~ Antonio Gramsci

On Father's Day: Faith's Wisdom via AB Goodwin

Where does Wisdom come from? In addition to the various religious traditions that teach the tenets of wisdom in their great books, self-knowledge, intuition, spiritual endeavors, pure reason and experience are key elements to developing wisdom. Sure, if you have any combination of the above, you might be considered wise but that is not enough.

One might ask: How do you treat others? Do you give others the benefit of the doubt until they prove themselves untrustworthy? How do you manage your demons? Do you invite them to dinner and then follow their directives? How do you honor yourself? Do you feed your mind a feast of lies or the unvarnished truth? How do you honor your ancestral/familial legacy? Do you remember to take/live the best life lessons learned from your family connections?

“The teacher who is indeed wise does not bid you to enter the house of his wisdom but rather leads you to the threshold of your mind.” ~ Kahlil Gibran

The Root of Wisdom via AB Goodwin...


How Great Thou Art – Billy Preston

Father’s Day is a great time to not only thank and praise all the strong male figures in our lives but a time to also reflect on the legacy left behind by our fathers and the wisdom gained from those relationships. My dad was a strong, charismatic and kind man. He was a hard working soul who believed that education, courage, God’s grace and a generous heart could surmount anything. When I remember him (he passed away in 1990), I remember the lessons he shared with us. Do you remember the lessons your learned from Yours? It is important to ask: What lessons did I learn from my father/grand-dad/strong male figure? What gifts of the spirit, vignettes or words of wisdom were passed on?

For me, I would say my dad passed on a love for learning, a generous spirit, a strong work ethic, self-respect and a legacy of faith in the wisdom of God, mother earth, the universe and the greater goodness of people. Not every fatherly lesson was good but as Rabbi Brad Hirschfield shared in his fox news piece today, even our biblical fathers, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were not all perfect or good.

“If facts are the seeds that later produce knowledge and wisdom, then the emotions and the impressions of the senses are the fertile soil in which the seeds must grow.” ~ Rachel Carson
We are made wise not by the recollection of our past, but by the responsibility for our future. ~ George Bernard Shaw

Father's Day: The Jewel of Wisdom via AB Goodwin

It is sufficient to suggest that even those who had terrible, wounding relationships with their fathers inherited a legacy that pervades their definition of the world they inhabit; they are repositories of equally powerful life lessons which they can/do teach the rest of us. For those of us who hold fond memories of our relationships with our dads, while the lessons imbibed were/are positive ones, the responsibility remains to pass these lessons on and add to the greater good.

Father’s Day By Mary Frances Bogle
Over the years —>—>God made fathers
As we grow old, —> —>Strong and firm,
We remember our father —> —>For he knew our lives
So brave and bold. —>—>Would have great concerns.

In the garden, —> —>So he gave us fathers
Leaning on the plow, —>—>To teach us to pray,
He would listen to me; —>—> And guide our lives,
I see him now. —> —>And show us the way.

He would give advice —>—>So on his day
And understand; —> —> Let’s take the time
He was always there —>—>To say “Thanks, dad.
To lend a hand. —>—> I’m glad you’re mine.”

“Follow your instincts. That’s where true wisdom manifests itself.” ~ Oprah Winfrey
“The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom: and the knowledge of the holy is understanding.” ~ Proverbs 1:7

On Father's Day: Wisdom is a Caring Heart & Mind via AB Goodwin

While King Solomon, author of the Book of Proverbs, asked for the ultimate gift – Wisdom – when God asked him what he wanted, many of us don’t think of that option in our lives. Yet, wisdom is a fundamental quality to building and living a productive family life. The gift of wisdom is to be cherished. May everyone find their inner wisdom and bliss; grace, guidance and goodwill. Here’s to a very Happy Father’s Day!

What life lessons did you learn from your dad/grand-dad/guardian? How do you honor your legacy and yourself? What are your thoughts on the subject of Wisdom? Father’s Day? Please leave us some feedback. Thank You!

COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER FOR VIDEOS***
Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

PHOTO CREDITS:
Mandala Photos via A. B. Goodwin ~ abgoodwin.com
All other Photographs ~ courtesy of Google Images

Until Next Time…
Ask. Believe. Receive. ©
Elizabeth Obih-Frank

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15 Comments leave one →
  1. Bree permalink
    21/06/2010 12:33 pm

    Beautiful post especially as it takes another look on the subject of father’s day!
    My dad left me a legacy of laughter and hope. Thank you for sharing this. We all need wisdom!

    Like

    • 23/06/2010 11:37 am

      Hope and Laughter are great gifts too! Thank you for stopping by to share your thoughts. 🙂

      Like

  2. Kari permalink
    22/06/2010 5:10 am

    Very beautiful… Divine Wisdom is needed in this world today and for all our fathers. I learned courage from my dad and I hope others will read and remember this important very message.

    Like

    • 23/06/2010 11:36 am

      Thank you for your comment! Wisdom is needed and we are all beneficiaries of the legacies of our fathers. 🙂

      Like

  3. 24/06/2010 4:46 am

    What a neat post! May all the fathers out there have wisdom to lead their families. Stopping by from SITS!

    Like

    • 24/06/2010 8:25 am

      Thanks for stopping by Heather and I’m all for fatherly wisdom in family life too. What gift did your dad pass on? 🙂
      On a side note, my prayers and blessing are with Brandi. Please keep us posted on that too.
      Cheers,
      Eliz

      Like

  4. Goz permalink
    26/06/2010 6:52 am

    Wonderful post and a reminder that wisdom is the principal thing we need to navigate life’s hurdles.. My Father left me the legacies of altruism and personal dignity amongst others.. The most impacting lessons are those our parents taught us by their personal example. Good food for thought.

    Like

  5. Goz permalink
    26/06/2010 7:06 am

    Great post as usual. Wisdom is without doubt the principal virtue. My father passed on the legacies of altruism and personal dignity to me, amongst others. Personal example of course, still remains the most effective method of communicating life principles..

    Like

  6. 26/06/2010 4:18 pm

    Thanks Goz, your feedback is always appreciated. Personal example is very important; we can profess all sorts of things but if our actions say something else … it negates all. Thank you and looking forward to that Guest post! 🙂
    Cheers,
    E

    Like

  7. Causstem permalink
    02/07/2010 11:05 am

    ahhhhhh very good, bookmarked 🙂 keep it up, JusyKassy.

    Like

    • 02/07/2010 5:18 pm

      Glad to read that you like it… It brought back many memories. What legacy did your dad pass on? Thanks and Happy 4th! 🙂

      Like

Trackbacks

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