Tag Archives: VandArt

Haiku: VandArt For You…

“I don’t think art is propaganda; it should be something that liberates the soul, provokes the imagination and encourages people to go further. It celebrates humanity instead of manipulating it.”  Keith Haring

Haiku: VandArt For You… Keith Haring’s vandart

Haiku: VandArt For You… George Lee Quiñones does subways

Haiku: VandArt For You… Jean-Michel Basquiat spray paint on canvas

Haiku: VandArt For You… Lady Pink’s Evolution Triptych

Vandalism Art…
Keith Haring did it well too
Graffiti Art, Flows…

I was looking at some truly magnificent graffiti art on Carl Milner’s blog post, Graffiti Factory, when in our exchange, the word VandArt came to me. In a creative flash, I had coined a new word – VandArt – as an abbreviation for Vandalism Art aka Graffiti. Don’t get me wrong, I love art and graffiti as an art form has always fascinated me; especially with its ties to hip hop culture. But, in its early days, graffiti was viewed as a form of vandalism… Of course, over the years, what used to be perceived as a nuisance or an act of vandalism evolved into more acceptable forms, and found its home in galleries and museums around the world.

“Graffiti is revolutionary, in my opinion, “and any revolution might be considered a crime. People who are oppressed or suppressed need an outlet, so they write on walls—it’s free.” Terrance Lindall

Haiku: VandArt For You… Banksy on Brick Lane East End, London…

Haiku: VandArt For You… Blek Le Rat…

Haiku: VandArt For You… Kenny Scharf, Mural on Houston

Haiku: VandArt For You… Keith Haring’s Crack is Wack…

Graffiti to You
Caged voices, defy the norm
Basquiat, Lee too…

People like Keith Haring,  Jean-Michel Basquiat, Lee Quinones, King Robbo, Banksy, Kenny Scharf, John Fekner, Pixnit, CrashLady Pink,  Alexander Brener, Dondi, Zephyr, Heathcote Williams,  Blek le Rat, and a host of other artists elevated the form by going beyond defacing subway trains and public spaces. VandArt was not just about the external form but about the greater internal message; the inner stance of the artist. As Aristotle explains: The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance. What do you remember about Graffiti? More below!

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