Tag Archives: Happiness

Haiku: The First Day Of Spring…

“Spring has returned. The Earth is like a child that knows poems.” Rainer Maria Rilke

Haiku: The First Day Of Spring... cherry blossoms  fill the air

Haiku: The First Day Of Spring… cherry blossoms fill the air

A shift in the winds
Cherry blossoms fill the air
The first day of spring

Today is Thursday March 20th, the first, official day of spring! The buds start to peak through; crocuses, forget-me-nots, blossoming cherry trees herald the awakening of a new day. Spring has sprung and we can set aside winter wear, listen to some Mamba and dance in the yard. Soon, we’ll see now vegetation and floral life everywhere.  Are you excited? What are your plans?

“Life stands before me like an eternal spring with new and brilliant clothes.” Carl Friedrich Gauss

Haiku: The First Day Of Spring... lighting equinox

Haiku: The First Day Of Spring… lighting equinox

The equinox calls
Balancing night with daylight
Our Hearts fluttering

Did you know the equinox  brings in spring; created by a balance… So take a moment to inhale the fresh air and enjoy the changing season and weather. I hope you enjoy the haiku shared. How did you celebrate the first day of spring? Happy Spring Haiku to all!
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St. Patrick’s Day: 10 Fascinating Facts About This Holiday

St. Patrick’s Day is an enchanted time – a day to begin transforming winter’s dreams into summer’s magic.” Adrienne Cook

St. Patrick's Day:  10 Fascinating Facts About This Holiday

St. Patrick’s Day: 10 Fascinating Facts – The longest Parade is in NY

St. Patrick's Day:  10 Fascinating Facts About This Holiday

St. Patrick’s Day: 10 Fascinating Facts – The shamrock is a reminder of the Holy Trinity

1.”Saint Patrick’s Day or the Feast of Saint Patrick (Irish: Lá Fhéile Pádraig, “the Day of the Festival of Patrick”) is a cultural and religious holiday celebrated annually on 17 March, the death date of the patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick (c. AD 385–461).”
2.”St. Patrick’s Day marks the Roman Catholic feast day for Ireland’s patron saint, who died in the 5th century. St. Patrick (Patricius in Latin) was not born in Ireland, but in Britain.”
3.”St. Patrick was kidnapped at 16 and brought to Ireland. He was sold as a slave in the county of Antrim and served in bondage for six years until he escaped to Gaul, in present-day France. He later returned to his parents’ home in Britain, where he had a vision that he would preach to the Irish. After 14 years of study, Patrick returned to Ireland, where he built churches and spread the Christian faith for some 30 years.”
4. “St. Patrick’s Day revelers wear a shamrock. Trifolium dubium, the wild-growing, three-leaf clover that some botanists consider the official shamrock, is an annual plant that germinates in the spring. According to St. Patrick’s Day lore, Patrick used the three leaves of a shamrock to explain the Christian holy trinity: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.”

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day! One of the joys of this day of revelry and parades is how much fun and creativity goes into celebrating this day. The parades showcase the best of Ireland and it’s immigrant population around the world, and people gather to toast to Saint Paddy and drink a Guinness stout in his memory. Of course, all the celebratory zeal means the parades linger on for quite a while and many don’t want it to end. In this post, the block quotes, above and below,  share ten insightful facts about this special day. Take a moment to read them.

“May you live to be a hundred years, With one extra year to repent.” Irish Blessing

St. Patrick's Day:  10 Fascinating Facts About This Holiday

St. Patrick’s Day: 10 Fascinating Facts – The Dublin parade is

5.One of the best known myths about this popular saint is that Patrick drove all the snakes from Ireland into the Irish Sea, where the serpents drowned. What about Leprechauns? They have nothing to do with this day and until the 19thC, these folklore characters wore red instead of green clothing.
6.”Colonial New York City hosted the first official St. Patrick’s Day parade in 1762, when Irish immigrants in the British colonial army marched down city streets. Dublin’s St. Patrick’s Day parade is little more than 75 years old.”
7.”In 1903, Saint Patrick’s Day became an official public holiday in Ireland. Until the 1970s, St. Patrick’s Day in Ireland was a minor religious holiday. A priest would acknowledge the feast day, and families would celebrate with a big meal, but that was about it.” Some say that St. Patrick’s Day was invented in America by Irish-Americans and the U.S. tradition of St. Patrick’s Day parades, packed pubs, and green has become popular in Ireland.

One special joy I have about this day is seeing the sea of green passing by as the parade winds it’s way around the city. It is always fascinating to see the different groups of Irish Immigrants, celebrities, political and social entities  join in the camaraderie of the day, as the official paraders try to outpace each other in their fascinating garb and entertainment. You are always entertained and I’d add that there is never a dull moment during the parade. Above are more facts to chew on and there is more below.

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International Women’s Day: Inspiring Change

“Never believe that a few caring people can’t change the world. For, indeed, that’s all who ever have.” Margaret Mead

International Women's Day: Inspiring Change

International Women’s Day: Inspiring Change


Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, UN Women Executive Director: International Women’s Day 2014


International Women’s Day Event on Advancing Women’s Economic Empowerment

Timeline of International Women’s Day (IWD)
28 February 1909 – First observed in the USA as National Women’s Day in Chicago
August 1910 – Attendees at the International Women’s Conference in Denmark propose the idea
18 March, 1911 – IWD was celebrated by over a million people in Europe; right to vote, hold public office and end gender discrimination at work were key issues.
February 1913 – Russian women observed their first International Women’s Day. In 1917, it became official in the region.
March 1914 – International Women’s Day was celebrated for the first time on Sunday, March 8, and this date has continued as the preferred/official day since.
October 1, 1949 – In the People’s Republic of China, the state council decided that March 8 would be made an official half day off holiday for women in China
1977 – International Women’s Day (marked by the UN since 1975), became a popular event when the United Nations General Assembly invited member states to proclaim March 8 as the official UN Day for women’s rights and world peace.
March 8 2010 – International Women’s Day – the ICRC (Red Cross) drew attention to the hardship displaced women endure (refugees and others at war) and has continued its call to end armed conflict.
March 8 2011 – International Women’s Day – Celebrations took place in more than 100 countries in commemoration of the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day
March 8 1996 -2014 –  Every year, the UN adopts a special theme  to focus attention on for International Women’s Day 2014 is Inspire Change. *See the rest below
Sources: UN Women Watch, International Women’s Day.com, Wikipedia

Today is International Women’s Day (IWD), also known as International Working Women’s Day and the theme for this year is – Inspiring Change.  The premise for the 2014 IWD theme is that we still need to not only champion the social, political and economic achievements of women, but also to continue to fight for women’s rights and inspire change globally. When I read about this year’s theme, what struck me was how far we’ve come and how much work remains in the struggle for Women’s equality in an unequal world. Even as more of us leave the home to go to work, our pay is still 77 cents for every dollar paid to our male colleagues, and, the proverbial glass ceiling remains a barrier for women in the workplace. For most women with children, the work day continues when they get home. In countries around the world, women are discouraged from getting an education, and early marriage and domestic abuse continues to rise.

International Women's Day: Inspiring Change

International Women’s Day: Inspiring Change


Google: International Women’s Day Doodle 2014
International Women’s Day Doodle 2014

Timeline of women’s rights (other than voting)
1718 – Gender segregation banned in Russia, Taxpaying women allowed to vote in Sweden, Married women allowed to manage/own property in Pennsylvania
1829 – Sati is banned in India
1864 – Elementary schools for girls are opened in Haiti
1873 – Mothers in the UK are granted guardianship for children at divorce
1887 – Universities open to women in Mexico
1900 – A school for female teachers is opened in Egypt
1902 – Foot binding abolished in China.
1986 – Women in Djibouti can stand for election
2007 – Women can serve in combat roles in the New Zealand Defense Force

When I speak to groups of women, I hear the same answer; We want change. We want work and pay equity. We want an end to domestic/spousal abuse and an end to all forms of violence against women. We want representation in higher office and so called non-traditional fields. However, change is not the responsibility of a few. Change cannot happen in a vacuum.  Each of us has a role to play and we can’t do it alone. We can work with organizations that help women and in our communities. What are you doing to empower other women and create change?

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