Tag Archives: Art

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dialogue In Art…

“Dialogue should simply be a sound among other sounds, just something that comes out of the mouths of people whose eyes tell the story in visual terms.”  Alfred Hitchcock

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dialogue Art in grafitti

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dialogue Art in graffiti

All of life is in constant dialogue. From our every day conversations with each other, to the display of art to compare or to contrast technique or form, we are surrounded by sounds and images that convey messages. As I thought about this exercise, I had the desire to run out and capture shots that would highlight this constant juxtaposition of sight and sound in artistic dialogue. I wanted to show how the mundane and profane occupy space in our world; sometimes with great difficulty.

Alas, time is my enemy and I can only show you this series and I hope you find meaning in them. The above is striking in its message of artistic infinity; the Keith Haring shots were from the Brooklyn Museum and upper Manhattan; the black and white squares from the Met Museum and the zigzag from my head band. Remember the famous “crack is whack”? Are the above sharing space or competing?

The dialogue between client and architect is about as intimate as any conversation you can have, because when you’re talking about building a house, you’re talking about dreams. Robert A. M. Stern

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dialogue Art in Convex

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dialogue Art in Complex forms

In the above, I had to bring in art that finds function near places of work or residences. The red Alexander Calder installations are huge yet they can be found in major cities in the middle of active, busy people living their lives. The smaller red Calder is in Chicago and the bigger one is at Storm King in New York. To reflect, literally, Stern’s comment about home, I thought The Bean in all its majesty is reflecting both people and buildings. Have you seen any of the above? What were your first impressions? Calder’s red structure is powerful and The bean is complex… But tell me your thoughts.
Change happens by listening and then starting a dialogue with the people who are doing something you don’t believe is right.”  Jane Goodall

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dialogue Art in Conversation

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dialogue Art in Conversation

I love the playfulness of this next set of artistic dialogue pieces. If you noticed, that happy cow on the right is alive and well … at Stone Barn Farm in Westchester County. The other metal one is not, but brings great value too because it was auctioned off to help children in Vermont. The woman (a Henry Moore) is giving the finger but, I can assure you, not to the three legged Buddha who remains serene even when life becomes unbelievably complicated that words can’t express it well… In all dialogue, there is the unspoken:Sometimes we hear it clearly and, at other times, we might have to listen with an inner ear; intuitively. What do these photos say to you?
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Work of Art

“Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time.” Thomas Merton

Weekly Photo Challenge: Work Of Art  ~ Joy of collages

Weekly Photo Challenge: Work Of Art ~ Joy of collages

Weekly Photo Challenge: Work Of Art  ~ Joy of collages

Weekly Photo Challenge: Work Of Art ~ Joy of collages

I love creating collages as they help me pull together things that catch my attention and remind me to pause and inhale the beauty in my surroundings. If art is in the eyes of the beholder, then we come to it with our own perspective and vision of the surrounding world.

“If you hear a voice within you say ‘you cannot paint,’ then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced.”  Vincent Van Gogh

Weekly Photo Challenge: Work Of Art  ~ Joy of collages

Weekly Photo Challenge: Work Of Art ~ Joy of collages

Weekly Photo Challenge: Work Of Art  ~ Joy of collages

Weekly Photo Challenge: Work Of Art ~ Joy of collages

Van Gogh’s quote made me stop and think… Why do we always allow others to negate our efforts? Why do we allow ourselves to succumb to subjective criticisms that discourage us from pursuing our craft? The difference between us and the masters we revere is that they stayed the course and worked on honing their innate talent till it stood out and captivated the observer. Some of the artists we admire today were poor and died miserably. Many years later, their work sells for hundreds of millions of dollars. Create your art and believe in its merit.

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Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met…

“They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.” Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Self-Portrait, Andy Warhol, 1967

Yesterday, I attended a preview of the upcoming Andy Warhol retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum in Manhattan; Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. It is the 50th anniversary of Warhol’s first solo exhibition. I went a bit late in the day, parked my car (the gods of street parking were generous and found me a spot close to the museum on 5th avenue), and headed for the museum entrance. Since this was the first day of a five day preview for members, I was concerned that the crowds would make it difficult to enjoy the collection. I was nicely surprised as the crowds must have come earlier in the day.

Although there were others with me in the Tisch Galleries on the 2nd floor, there was plenty of elbow room and I moved with ease through the five sections and snapped a few photos to share with you. The exhibition showcased 50 works by Warhol and 100 from about 60 other artists and presented what was, as per the invitation: “prime examples of Warhol’s paintings, sculpture, and films with those by other artists who in key ways reinterpret, respond, or react to his ground breaking work. What emerges is a fascinating dialogue between works of art and artists across generations.” The selections were far-ranging and engaging. Maybe too far-ranging for some critics. There were large and small pieces, video selections and wallpapered environments, and I spent the next two hours absorbed in a fantastic, somewhat chaotic Warholian world.

Pop art is for everyone.” Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Green Coca-Cola Bottles, and Big Campbell’s Soup-can 19c, Andy Warhol, 1962

Until his death in 1987, Andy Warhol was the reigning king of Pop Art culture and a huge iconic influence on the innovative approach to creative uses of multimedia in the art world. The exhibition is divided into five sections to highlight what guest curator, Mark Rosenthal, and his team categorized as representing the broad phenomenon of the “Warhol effect.” The five thematic sections are: “Daily News: From Banality to Disaster,” “Portraiture: Celebrity and Power,” “Queer Studies: Shifting Identities,” “Consuming Images: Appropriation, Abstraction, and Seriality,” and “No Boundaries: Business, Collaboration, and Spectacle.” Many of Warhol’s significant/signature works are included and innovative, even humorous pieces by other artists add a wonderful, eclectic depth to the show; highlighting his influence on many contemporary artists as well as his enduring legacy.


Andy Warhol Exhibit at Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York: The Artist Who Created ‘Pop Art’

In the photos included in this post, I’ve separated them into the groupings created by the curators. The titles are pretty self explanatory; however, I’ve added some valuable information (in italics) from the The Met Museum’s page on the exhibition. The exhibition will open to the general public on Tuesday, September 18 through December 31, 2012. Museum hours are: Tuesday–Thursday: 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 9:30 a.m.–9:00 p.m., and Sunday: 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. The museum is closed on Mondays. For more information visit: Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. I loved the exhibit perhaps because I didn’t go with preconceived ideas of what it should or should not include… As Warhol once said, “Art is anything you can get away with.” I’ll encourage everyone to go see it. Enjoy the show!

“I wanted to paint nothing. I was looking for something that was the essence of nothing, and the soup can was it.” Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Ambulance Disaster, Andy Warhol, 1963-64

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Icebox, Andy Warhol, 1961, Plastik Wannen, Sigmar Polke, 1964, and Brillo Soap Pad Boxes, Andy Warhol, 1964

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Ushering in Banality, Jeff Koons,1988

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Helmsboro Country, Hans Haacke, 1990

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Eight over Eight, Damien Hirst, 1997-98

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Hanging Man Sleeping Man, Robert Gober, 1989

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Hochsitz mit Gansen, (Watchtower with geese), Sigmar Polke, 1987-88

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Untitled Head, Jean-Michel Basquiat, 1981

Daily News: From Banality to Disaster:explores Warhol’s engagement with the imagery of everyday life, his interest in items of consumerist American culture in the 1960s, and his keen attention to advertising, tabloids, and magazines. Also includes works by artists “who share Warhol’s fascination with disaster or death.” Via The Met. Some Relevant Artists in this section: Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst, Ai Wei Wei, Sigmar Polke, Hans Haacke, Tom Sachs, Robert Gober, and Jean-Michel Basquiat.

“If you want to know all about Andy Warhol, just look at the surface of my paintings and films and me, and there I am. There’s nothing behind it.” Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Turquoise Marilyn, Andy Warhol, 1964

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Nine Jackies, Andy Warhol, 1964

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Michael Jackson and Bubbles, Jeff Koons, 1988, and Liza Minnelli (background), Francesco Vezzoli, 1999

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met…Barbara Walters, Julian Schnabel, 1990

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Malcolm X, (Small version 1) #1, Glenn Ligon, 2001

Andy Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years. Opens At The Met… Philip Glass, Chuck Close, 1969

Portraiture: Celebrity and Power:looks at Warhol’s engagement with portraiture to illuminate contemporary artists’ continuing interest in the issues of fame or infamy in the age of the tabloid.Via The Met. Some Relevant Artists in this section: Elizabeth Peyton, Karen Kilimnik, Cindy Sherman, Francesco Vezzoli, Jeff Koons, Glenn Ligon, Robert Mapplethorpe, Julian Schnabel, Maurizio Cattelan, Alex Katz and Chuck Close.

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