Category Archives: Positive Advice

Haiku: The Butterfly Effect

“It has been said that something as small as the flutter of a butterfly’s wing can ultimately cause a typhoon halfway around the world.” Chaos Theory

Haiku: The Butterfly Effect

Haiku: The Butterfly Effect

We flit, here and there
Change one thing, change everything…
Butterfly effect

We are connected
our flapping wings, your big mouth
Chaos stirs within…

We are all connected because everything around us is energy… we just have to get there in our heads and hearts. This week’s writing challenge spoke to my heart. It was a great exercise on reflection and it stirred something deep inside of me. We move through this world alert or oblivious to the connections we all share. At any moment, our simple actions, our kind or wicked gestures, can lead to good or evil. Which one, is hard to tell. The butterfly effect is a fascinating concept and it gave me food for thought.

“The things that really change the world, according to Chaos theory, are the tiny things. A butterfly flaps its wings in the Amazonian jungle, and subsequently a storm ravages half of Europe.” Neil Gaiman

Haiku: The Butterfly Effect

Haiku: The Butterfly Effect

Our actions move things
Like a ripple in a pond
A slight shift, karma…

Each storm reminds us
Rainbows soothe earth’s darkest hours
One kiss heals our pain

I kept thinking about the slight shifts in the earth that lead to tremors, to earth quakes or even tsunamis. I think about how our actions and our words can lead to the dissolution of marriages and friendships, and even lead nations to war; a simple flap of our big mouth and rockets greet our day. The butterfly flits from here to there innocently spreading floral and fumes of chaos. How does this play out in your life? What triggers that ripple effect around you?
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CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

“Man needs colour to live; it’s just as necessary an element as fire and water.” Fernand Léger ( February 4, 1881 – August 17, 1955)

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Composition (The Typographer) Fernand Léger, 1918–19

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum -Composition (The Typographer) Fernand Léger

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Houses under the Trees
Fernand Léger 1913

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum: A look at The Leonard A. Lauder Collection
If you happen to visit New York in the coming weeks and months, I encourage you to spend some time at the upcoming exhibition on CUBISM at The Metropolitan Museum. Spread over seven galleries,  it features 80 works by 4 of its most celebrated Cubist artists: Fernand Léger, Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Juan Gris. The exhibition offers a fantastic journey through some of their artwork, curated from Leonard Lauder’s impressive collection, and outlines the genesis of Cubism. It will open to the public on Oct 20 – Feb 16. Make sure to see it as I bet you’ll enjoy the exciting range of artwork in the collection. I loved every minute of it.

In case you’ve forgotten, Mr Leonard Lauder,  Chairman emeritus of Estee Lauder, announced,  in April 2013, that he was making a huge donation of his Cubist art collection worth over $1 billion dollars to The Met Museum. His collection includes 33 Picassos, 17 Braques, 14 Légers and 14 works by Gris and has put The Met Museum in an envious position of becoming a major repository of  Cubist art. Cubism is considered the most influential art movement of the early 20th century and those 4 artists were either co-founders and/or innovative contributors to the movement.  I’ve added a brief history of each artist with links to Wikipedia and The Met Museum where you can learn and see more of the art work.  Do you plan to see the collection? What are your thoughts?

Joseph Fernand Henri Léger  (French) was a painter, sculptor, and filmmaker. He was one the earliest artists to create a form of cubism in his art work.  He was also considered a forerunner of pop art because of  his bold treatment of modern subjects in his art work. Over time, he modified his art to a figurative, populist style. I love his use of bold, strong colors and the seemingly simple yet complex nature of his art.

“The artist is a receptacle for emotions that come from all over the place: from the sky, from the earth, from a scrap of paper, from a passing shape, from a spider’s web.” Pablo Picasso (25 October 1881 – 8 April 1973)

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum - Woman in a Chemise in an Armchair, Pablo Picasso, 1914

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Woman in a Chemise in an Armchair, Pablo Picasso, 1914

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Woman in a Chemise in an Armchair, Pablo Picasso, 1914

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Two Nudes
Pablo Picasso 1909, Woman with a book, 1909

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Museum entrance announcing the 4 featured Cubists


Leonard A. Lauder on Collecting Cubism

Pablo Ruiz y Picasso (Spanish) lived into the 1970’s and some of us were around when he was still alive and creating his art. He was a painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist, stage designer, poet and playwright. He spent the bulk of his productive, creative life in France and some people mistakenly assume he was french.  Picasso is credited with developing, exploring, and creating a wide variety of styles; he co-founded the Cubist movement, invented constructed sculpture, and co-invented the art of collage with Georges Braque. He is considered one of the greatest and most influential artists of the 20th century. I’ve always loved his artwork and have been drawn to his African influenced art.

“There is only one valuable thing in art: the thing you cannot explain.” Georges Braque (13 May 1882 – 31 August 1963)

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum - Still Life with Clarinet (Bottle and Clarinet) Georges Braque (French, Argenteuil 1882–1963 Paris) 1911

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Still Life with Clarinet (Bottle and Clarinet) Georges Braque (French, Argenteuil 1882–1963 Paris) 1911

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Still Life with Clarinet (Bottle and Clarinet) Georges Braque (French, Argenteuil 1882–1963 Paris) 1911

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Bottle, Glass, and Pipe (Violette de Parme) Georges Braque,1914

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Fruit Dish and Glass
Georges Braque, 1912, Head of a Woman Georges Braque, 1912

Georges Braque  (French) was a highly regarded 20th-century painter, collagist, draughtsman, printmaker and sculptor.  Braque invented the papier collé technique which is a form of collage making and you can see the style in the photo above. He also wielded enormous influence through his artistic contributions; particularly his alliance with Fauvism from 1906,  his close association with the work of his colleague Pablo Picasso from 1908 to 1912, and his involvement in the development of Cubism. I’m a huge fan of collage, so you can imagine how much this exhibition and Braque’s art meant to me.

“You are lost, the moment you know what the result will be.” Juan Gris (March 23, 1887 – May 11, 1927)

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum - Head of a Woman (Portrait of the Artist's Mother) Juan Gris Paris, 1912

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Head of a Woman (Portrait of the Artist’s Mother) Juan Gris Paris, 1912

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Head of a Woman (Portrait of the Artist’s Mother) Juan Gris Paris, 1912

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Head of a Woman (Portrait of the Artist’s Mother) Juan Gris, 1912

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Pears and Grapes on a Table
Juan Gris, 1913

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum

CUBISM: The Exhibition At The Met Museum – Back of Houses in Paris, Place Ravignan, Juan Gris

José Victoriano (Carmelo Carlos) González-Pérez  (Spanish) was better known as Juan Gris. Gris was a painter and sculptor. He grew up in Madrid  but spent most of his life living and working in France. He was influenced by Cubism which was seen as the innovative, artistic, genre of his day.  His creative body of work is considered among the  most distinctive of the Cubist movement and, even though he lived for only 40 years, his innovative work remains one of the top artistic expressions of the Cubist period. I found his collection truly inspiring, by virtue of its range and subject matter.

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Blog Action Day: Shine A Light On Inequality

“If we want a world that works for the many, not the few, we need to tackle inequality.” Ben Phillips, Campaigns, Policy and Influencing Dir,(GB) Oxfam International

Blog Action Day: Shine A Light On Inequality

Blog Action Day: Shine A Light On Inequality

Blog Action Day: Shine A Light On Inequality

Blog Action Day: Shine A Light On Inequality

What is Blog Action Day? Today is Blog Action Day and the focus is on the topic of Inequality. You may participate and use the following tags for this year: #BAD2014 #Blogaction14, #Inequality, #Oct16  In case you are wondering what this is about, Blog Action Day was founded in 2007 by a group of passionate bloggers who felt that, as a collective voice, we can raise awareness about issues that affect us all. It is a day that brings together bloggers from around the world to write about one key global topic on the same day. Each year, we focus on one pressing concern; this year we are writing about Inequality. In the past, we wrote about Water, Climate Change, Poverty, Food, Power of We and Human Rights. Since 2007, over 25,000 blogs have participated in this blogging challenge. It is never too late to join the effort to address issues that affect us all. Go here to register and if you can’t write a post this year, aim to write one next year

“Inequality can be overcome if we work together to combat discrimination of marginalized and minority groups.” Karen Johnson, the Global Campaign Coordinator, International HIV/AIDS Alliance

Blog Action Day: Shine A Light On Inequality

Blog Action Day: Shine A Light On Inequality


TheRulesOrg: Global Wealth Inequality – What you never knew you never knew.

Why use Inequality instead of Global Inequality? As much as I wanted to call specific attention to this universal problem by using the term global inequality with my post title, I didn’t. Why? Because, sadly, when some hear the term global, they think “not in my country, it’s happening elsewhere.” By including the generic term – Inequality  – to my post, my wish is that we see that word as a problem that has enormous ramifications for all of us. Inequality is local, national and global. It is here and everywhere.  It is a humanity issue. While examples of inequality are glaring in so-called 3rd world countries, frankly, it remains a systemic problem in the USA, in Europe, and everywhere else.

What does inequality look like? Do you have adequate healthcare, full access to a quality education, a safe place to live, decent clothing, dental care, healthy food to eat, clean water, a decent paying job, retirement savings on earned income, basic freedoms and rights? What about your neighbors?  And the marginalized minority? And the family across the train tracks? What systems are in place to combat or to perpetuate poverty and other forms of inequity in your society? How do you contribute to the problem? How do you suffer because of this problem?  What are you/we doing to help? How are we contributing to the disenfranchisement and unequal treatment of others? Pause for a moment and ask yourself these questions. How do they make you feel?

“Without a concerted effort to tackle inequality, the cascade of privilege and of disadvantage will continue down the generations, and equality of opportunity will be just a dream.”  Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director, Oxfam International

Blog Action Day: Shine A Light On Inequality

Blog Action Day: Shine A Light On Inequality

Why is there inequality in the world? Can we end it?
When we think of inequality, what comes to mind is the control and division of resources by big business/the powerful elite, and the impact on all of us running this rat race we call life.  It is heartbreaking to think that there are kids going to bed hungry in an unsafe environment in almost every country on this planet.  It is frightening that the World Bank identified 111 of the top 175 economic entities in the world as corporations; these corporations wield great power over democratic institutions, and their influence affects us and our environment. It is disturbing that the richest 300 people on earth have as much wealth as the poorest 3 billion. YES, even in your country.  It is equally disturbing that the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund step aside after funding corporations that grab land and resources from developing nations. These multinational corps force indigenous people from their homes and locals from their land by what is known as accumulation by dispossession.  We live in a world of international inequalities and the atrocities go on and on…

Why such inequality? Here are some facts: Over the years, the Wealth Gap has grown from a ratio of 3:1 to 35:1 and is now at 80:1.  Large Corporations hide behind tax breaks, unfair trade agreements and control of resources that take $900 Billion dollars out of poor nations yearly.  The feminization of poverty means larger numbers of females, uneducated and underemployed, fall below the poverty line. Greed, waste, corporate corruption, secret arrangements, marginalization of minority groups, disenfranchisement of communities of people, and other types of discriminatory practices help keep the poor down and most of us struggling.  Social and Financial exclusion,  creation of  a cycle of poverty, Economic inequality, Income disparity, harsh structural adjustment programs, illiteracy, hunger, disease, corrupt governments and inept policies all contribute to maintain and control a poor underclass and a struggling middle class.

Can we end it?  Yes, we can end it by being mindful of our actions and how we use our natural resources. We can end it by choosing to be informed about how we can make a difference instead of burying our heads in the sand.  We can end it by speaking up and demanding fair and compassionate policies from our governments. We can speak up and put an end to the $9 billion dollar PR propaganda machines that shirk all decency rules by offering “cultural change” services to corrupt governments to keep them in power and keep their citizens impoverished. Ignorance is not bliss! It will take time. According to a blog post by Winnie Byanyima, Oxfam International, Executive Director, there are international agreements responding to “the need to take action against rising and damaging economic inequality” and that is an important shift. To learn more about this subject and the courageous non-profits that work hard to make sure we don’t ever forget the plight of the poor, read more below. There are interviews and insights gathered from organizations that support the eradication of extreme poverty and inequality globally.  This is a global human issue. Where do you stand on the subject?

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