Haiku: A House Is Not A Home

“A house is not a home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body.” Benjamin Franklin

Haiku: A House Is Not A HomeHaiku: A House Is Not A Home ... when love seeps away

Haiku: A House Is Not A Home … when love seeps away

A house is not home…
Measured blows and silent screams
Repeated daily

A house is not home
Love lost, betrayals exposed
At the door … divorce

A house is not home
Children leave, no lingering
Memories of hurt

What are the earliest memories of the place you lived in as a child?  I grew in a family that traveled a lot, mainly, because of my father’s work and also because of our time in a war zone.  Each home we lived in had its own special energy and smell. Some had the energy of happy homes, while a few were sad;  a couple of them were even haunted houses.  Aside from the distinctions I observed, one thing that remained constant was that each home provided a safety net from the travails of the outside world.

My haiku is not a description of my experience  but more a remembrance for those who have not had a chance to enjoy the love and safety of a home.  Our homes are meant to be places of  love and safety but sometimes, they become places of pain and suffering.  If you grew up in a joyful home, be grateful for the blessing and make sure that your home is a blessing to others. If you didn’t grow up in a happy home, seize the opportunity to turn the tables on the past and create place of joy for your self. What are your memories of your home?

More below. Cherish the peace and joy in yours. Create/Go to a safe place if you don’t. B

“Where we love is home – home that our feet may leave, but not our hearts.” Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

A house is not home
Warring neighbors hurling barbs
False and real fences

A house is not home
Crumbling floors, absent landlords
Bold roaches, dancing

A house is not home
Abandoned hearts and gardens
A home has life, soul…

This post was inspired by Daily Prompt: Our House - What are the earliest memories of the place you lived in as a child? Describe your house. What did it look like? How did it smell? What did it sound like? Was it quiet like a library, or full of the noise of life? Tell us all about it, in as much detail as you can recall. Photographers, artists, poets: show us HOME.

Positive Motivation Tip:  Our homes are meant to be places of  love and safety but sometimes, they become places of pain and suffering.  Cherish the peace and joy in yours. Create/Go to a safe place if you don’t. Blessings!

PHOTO CREDITS/ATTRIBUTIONS: All Photos Houseboat, Homeless, Vassandor,  Kamena House, MorrocanHouse, FazaHouse, SeoulHouse, JapanHouse, BluesHouse, via Wikipedia or my collection

Until Next Time…
Ask. Believe. Receive. ©
Elizabeth Obih-Frank
Mirth and Motivation
Positive Kismet

About these ads

32 responses to “Haiku: A House Is Not A Home

  1. Eliz, a beautiful, touching post.

  2. Such a beautiful post. Thank you.

  3. Sad…in some respects…but, such wonderful words describing what homes can be… and what they should be…I’ve yet to write the post to this prompt…but, will…

  4. Beautiful! We also moved around a lot when I was a child, and I still do as an adult. I came to think of “home” as my family, not so much a place. I was blessed that my home was happy.

  5. I grew up in a house with my parents, sister and both my grandmothers so it was so full of love.

  6. Your childhood sounds interesting Eliz, plenty of stories no doubt? I like both sets of haiku, but the first are very moving. The form is a very powerful way of writing about abuse.
    On a happier note, I’ve been to the blue house, it’s in Marrkech, Les Jardins Majorelle, an absolutely beautiful place.

  7. Pingback: Daily Prompt: Our House | Chronicles of an Anglo Swiss

  8. Beautiful post. You have the essence of home down. I like how you say that is you don’t have a safe place create one. I have found in being a parent this is to be true time and time again.

  9. Pingback: Empty space? | Words 'n Pics...

  10. I don’t know how you do it, but you always come up with the best and most nourishing of quotes. This one is another cracker. I’m one of those, “turn the tables on the past” guys, and I hope I’ve made a good job of it

  11. We moved around a lot while I was growing up and I hated it. Just when I would make new friends and get comfortable we were on the move again. That’s why I’m determined to provide a stable home for my kids.

  12. ChristianCouponDiva (@RealCouponDiva)

    very good to hear – what home really is….

  13. I enjoyed it! We forget that our houses are more than just an address. It has everlasting memories whether good or bad.

  14. The first home I actually remember was in a little town called Batesville. It was on a farm next to an orchard, so we always got fresh fruit! It was quiet and peaceful! :)

  15. Pingback: Daily Prompt: Home | The Wandering Poet

  16. I was born and bread in the same home for 24 years, and now we live in my wife’s family home.. I guess we stayed close to home!

  17. We moved around a lot when I was little, but I am back now where I was born and mainly raised

  18. What an awesome post and how true. My earliest memories of our first home is of my parents having a New Years Party. Most of the people who were there have passed and I miss them daily but love the lasting memory of the fun and love in that house.

  19. I haven’t heard the quote “A house is not a home unless it contains food and fire for the mind as well as the body” before…but I really like it. I have great memories growing up as a child – my house was full of love and good times. I did however have a strict father and didn’t experience a lot of things that my friends did until I was much older BUT as I look back, it did help me to appreciate the little things more, and while my friends had exhausted all of their young adult experiences and new memories, I was just getting started and I think it helped to make me the well-rounded person that I am today. I was and still am very close to my mother and father, and now to my brother (it took a bit of time to get over the 6 year age gap and him destroying all of my things as a younger brother).

  20. I love the quote and this is such a beautiful post! I hope my children look back on their childhood and remember the love we all share in our home.

  21. Beautiful photo. Thanks for sharing!

  22. We lived in Florida for a few years when I was a little sprout and I remember the fabulous pool with a waterfall ur backyard. I would pretend my Barbie dolls were living in a jungle and my cat would sit in the tropical plants and play “tiger” with me.

  23. Thank You for sharing! Beautiful!

  24. This is so inspriring! :)

  25. My memories of my first home as a child were cosy ones. Log fires, cuddles with my Mom and my dad playing guitar. I remember the parties and fun we had and the paddling pool in the garden. It wasn’t lavish, but it was filled with love and fun.

  26. Pingback: Daily Prompt: Our House | Nola Roots, Texas Heart

  27. I grew up in a military home so we moved quite a bit. It’s not the house that makes the home, but rather the people living in it. Although we never stayed in one place for very long, I felt secure in my home. My husband and I bought a house 10 years ago. We have remodeled it inside and out, and it is just now starting to feel like the home I’d like it to be. We’ve invested so much time, energy, and money into the place that now, I’m attached to the house, not just the people living in it.

    • Beautiful Michelle! Like you, we moved homes a lot and as our family grew and our houses got larger, we had to really make them a home… It’s the love, people, energy and memories that we tie to home. TY!

  28. Melissa Smith

    Growing up, it was always just my mother & me. Except for a short period of time that we lived with my grandparents. But no matter where we lived, it was home as long as I had my mom with me.

  29. Mariana (@ohMariana)

    That’s a lovely quote by Mr. Franklin, and a beautiful blue house!

Your Comments are Always Appreciated. Thank You!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s